SEA-RELATED COURSES - current academic year

SEA-RELATED COURSES - current academic year

Although Yale does not offer a degree in Southeast Asia Studies, for those students interested in this area of specialization, the courses below are fully, substantially, or partially Southeast Asian in Content.

Course numbers: 001-499 undergrad *; 500-800 graduate; a/b - fall/spring

 *Summer Abroad in Singapore is a Yale Summer Session course open to both graduate and undergraduate students.


 
ANTHROPOLOGY
 
 

ANTH 244a, Modern Southeast Asia
Erik Harms
Introduction to the peoples and cultures of Southeast Asia, with special emphasis on the challenges of modernization, development, and globalization; Southeast Asian history, literature, arts, belief systems, agriculture, industrialization and urbanization, politics, ecological challenges, and economic change.

ANTH 339/539b, Urban Ethnographies of Asia
Erik Harms
(Substantial Southeast Asian content)
Introduction to the anthropological study of contemporary Asian cities.  Focus on new ethnographies about cities in East, Southeast, and South Asia.  Topics include rural-urban migration, redevelopment, evictions, social movements, land grabbing, master-planned developments, heritage preservation, utopian aspirations, social housing, slums and precariousness, and spatial cleansing.

ANTH 406a, Rivers: Nature and Politics (see also EVST 424 / PLSC 420)
James Scott
(Some/partial Southeast Asian content)
The natural history of rivers and river systems and the politcs surrounding the efforts of states to manages and engineer them.  (permission of instructor required)

ANTH 409a Climate and Society from Past to Present (see also EVST 422A / F&ES 422a)
Michael Dove
(some/partial Southeast Asian content)
The history of scholarly thinking on the relationship between climate and society, focusing on teh social sciences in general and on anthropology in particular.  Historical theories about climate and society since the beginning of human civilization; the importance of such theories for understanding contemporary debates about climate change.  Special attention to current debates regarding climate politics and science denial.  No pre-requisites.  Graduate students may enroll with instructor’s permission.

ANTH 541a, Agrarian Societies: Culture, Society, History, and Development (See also F&ES 753a /HIST 965a / PLSC 779a
James Scott, Kalyanakrishnan Sivaramakrishnan, Peter Purdue
(Some/partial Southeast Asian content)
An interdisciplinary examination of agrarian societies, contemporary and historical, Western and non-Western. Major analytical perspectives from anthropology, economics, history, political science, and environmental studies are used to develop a meaning-centered and historically-grounded account of the transformation of rural societies. Four-hour lecture-plus-discussion. (open to undergraduates with special permission)

ANTH 581a,Society and Environment: Introduction to Theory and Method (See also F&ES 520a)
Michael R. Dove
(Substantial Southeast Asian content)
This is an introductory course on the scope of social scientific contributions to environmental and natural resource issues.  No prerequisites. This is a ‘Foundation’ course in F&ES, a ‘Core’ course in the joint F&ES/Anthropology doctoral degree program, and a prerequisite for F&ES 869b/ANTH572b. Three-hour lecture/seminar.

951a or b Directed Research in Ethnology & Social Anthropology
952a or b Directed Research in Linguistics

 
 
 
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
 

EVST 422a, Climate and Society from Past to Present (See ANTH 409a for description)  
(Some/partial Southeast Asian content)

EVST 424a, Rivers: Nature and Politics (See ANTH 406a for description)
(Some/partial Southeast Asian content)

 
 
FORESTRY AND ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
 

F&ES 422a, Climate and Society from Past to Present (See ANTH 409a for description)  
(Some/partial Southeast Asian content)

F&ES 753a, Agrarian Societies: Culture, Society, History, and Development
James Scott, Kalyanakrishnan Sivaramakrishnan, Peter Purdue
(Some/partial Southeast Asian content)
See ANTH 541a for course description

F&ES 520a, Society and Environment: Introduction to Theory and Method
See ANTH 581a for course description
Michael R. Dove
(Some/partial Southeast Asian content)

 

 
HISTORY
 

HIST 502b,  Slavery, Dependency and Genocide in the Ancient and Pre-Modern World
Ben Kiernan, Noel Lenski
(Partial Southeast Asian content: pre-modern Cambodia, Vietnam, Burma and Malaya)
covers the subject of class and ethnic repression from teh third millennium BCE to the mid-second millennium CE.  Analyzes textual, epigraphic and iconographic sources for slavery, dependency and genocide in Assyrian, Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Han, Germanic, Angkorian, Vietnamese, Burmese, Malay, Mayan and Aztec cultures

HIST 895b,  Twentieth Century Viet Nam: Colonialism, War and Society
Ben Kiernan
French colonial rule, cultural change, Japanese occupation, and the origins, course, and aftermath of the Vietnamese-American conflict. War and society from the formation of a modern national identity to the rise of communism, the resurgence of Buddhism, independence and division, the U.S. intervention, escalation and defeat, the postwar Cambodian conflict and the 1979 Chinese invasion, regional integration, and economic reform. Readings, discussion, and research.

HIST 965a Agrarian Societies: Culture, Society, History, and Development
Kalyanakrishnan Sivaramakrishnan, et al
(Some/partial Southeast Asian content)
See ANTH 541a for course description

HIST 321b,  Imagining Modern Indonesia: 1900-Today
Jessica Melvin
From its inception the idea of Indonesia was seen as a means of unifying a diverse people from over 300 distinct ethnic groups united in their opposition to Dutch colonial rule, yet the idea of what sort of a state Indonesia should become has often been contested. This subject explores the different ways in which Indonesia has been imagined from the colonial period, through Indonesia’s national revolution, to the ideological clashes of the early 1960s and the New Order regime to the present. Freshman seminar

 
HISTORY OF ART
 

HSAR 453a, Textiles of Asia 800 to 1800 CE.
Ruth Barnes
(some/partial Southeast Asian content)
Survey of the great textile traditions of Asia: China, India and the Islamic world.  The roles of Central and Southeast Asia as import regions for transmitting styles and techniques will also be explored.  This course will make extensive use of the Yale Art Gallery’s textile collections.  (open to 3rd and 4th year students)

 
INDONESIAN
 

(Click on -> Indonesian Language Studies at Yale)
Courses at the elementary, intermediate, and advanced levels (110-180) are open to both graduate and undergraduate students. Graduate students should consult with their home departments regarding course credit.

INDN 110a and 120b, Elementary Indonesian I and II. Indriyo Sukmono
An introductory course in standard Indonesian with emphasis on developing communicative skills through systematic survey of grammar and graded exercises. Introduction to reading in the second term, leading to mastery of language patterns, essential vocabulary, and basic cultural competence. 1.5 Course cr

INDN 130a and 140b, Intermediate Indonesian I and II. Dinny Risri Aletheiani
Continued practice in colloquial Indonesian conversation and reading and discussion of texts. (After INDN 120 or equivalent) 1.5 Course cr

INDN 150a or 150b, Advanced Indonesian I. Dinny Risri Aletheiani
Development of speaking, listening, writing, and grammar skills to an advanced level. A semi-directed study in which the focus of the course depends on the research interests of the students.
Prerequisite: INDN 140 or equivalent.

INDN 160b, Advanced Indonesian II. Indriyo Sukmono
Continued development of advanced level fluency. Prerequisite: INDN 150 or equivalent and permission of the instructor.

INDN 180b, Research and Creative Project on Indonesia. Dinny Risri Aletheiani
Continuation of INDN 170. Expansion of communicative competence through completion of research projects: weekly oral and written presentations, journal, and final research paper.

INDN 470a/471b, Independent Tutorial. Dinny Risri Aletheiani
For undergraduate students with advanced Indonesian language skills who wish to engage in concentrated reading and research on material not otherwise offered in courses. The work must be supervised by an adviser and must terminate in a term paper or its equivalent. (Pre-requisites: completion of Advanced Indonesian, Permission of instructor/submission of project proposal)

INDN 560 a/b, Readings in Indonesian. Indriyo Sukmono
For graduate students with advanced Indonesian language skills preparing for academic performance and/or research purposes. (Prerequisite: INDN 560 or equivalent; permission of the instructor)

 

 

MUSIC
 

MUSI 232, Central Javanese Gamelan Ensemble.  Maho Ishiguru, (Visiting Instructor in Music, Wesleyan University)
An introduction to performing the orchestral music of central Java and to the theoretical, cultural and aesthetic discourses of the gamelan tradition.  Student form the nucleus of a gamelan ensemble that consists primarily of tuned gongs and metallophones.  The course culminates in a public performance by the ensemble at the end of the semester.  No previous musical experience required. This class also requires students to explore cultural background of gamelan tradition through reading articles and watching films and discussions in class. (permission of instructor required; meets during reading period)
See also, Yale Gamelan Suprabanggo

 
PHILOSOPHY
 

*PHIL 210b Eastern Philosophy. Quang Phu Van
(Substantial Southeast Asian content)
An Introduction to Eastern philosophy through the study of philosophical and religious texts. Topics include reality and illusion, knowledge, self, right and wrong, nonattachment, meditation, aesthetics, meaning of life, and death. (summer 2017 offering)

 
POLITICAL SCIENCE
 

PLSC 420, Rivers: Nature and Politics (See ANTH 406a for description)
James Scott
(some/partial Southeast Asian content)

PLSC 779a Agarian Societies: Culture, Society, History, and Development. See ANTH 541a for description.
James Scott, Kalyanakrishnan Sivaramakrishnan, Peter Purdue
(some/partial Southeast Asian content)

 
 
VIETNAMESE LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE
 

(Click on -> Vietnamese Studies at Yale)
Courses at the elementary, intermediate, and advanced levels (110-180) are open to both graduate and undergraduate students. Graduate students should consult with their home departments regarding course credit.

VIET 110a and 120b, Elementary Vietnamese I and II. Quang Phu Van
Students acquire basic working ability in Vietnamese including sociocultural knowledge. Attention paid to integrated skills such as speaking, listening, writing (Roman script), and reading. No previous knowledge of or experience with Vietnamese language required.

VIET 132a and 142b: Accelerated Vietnamese I and II Quang Phu Van
Courses follow a community-based language model designed for heritage students or speakers who comprehend and speak informal Vietnamese on topics related to everyday situations but do not read or write Vietnamese. Study of interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communicative modes, as well as standard foreign language education (communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities). Students will engage with Vietnamese American communities in New Haven and beyond.
(Permission of instructor required)

*VIET 220b, Introduction to Vietnamese Culture, Values, and Literature (also LITR 279b / ER&M 209b)
Quang Phu Van 
(not offered in 2017-18 - to be offered in *Spring 2019 - offered alternate years only)

VIET 150a, Advanced Vietnamese. Quang Phu Van
Aims to enable students to achieve greater fluency and accuracy in the language beyond the intermediate level and to solidify reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. Topics will include social, economic, and cultural practices, gender issues, notions of power, taboo, etc. Prerequisite: VIET 140 or equivalent.

VIET 470a / 471b, Independent Tutorial Quang Phu Van
For undergraduate students with advanced Vietnamese language skills who wish to engage in concentrated reading and research on material not otherwise offered in courses. The work must be supervised by an adviser and must terminate in a term paper or its equivalent. (Permission of instructor/submission of project proposal)

VIET 570b Readings in Vietnamese Quang Phu Van
For graduate students with advanced Vietnamese language skills who wish to engage in concentrated reading and research.

 


STUDY ABROAD OPPORTUNITIES
 

  *Yale undergraduates seeking CREDIT for approved non-Yale summer or term abroad courses must apply through the Yale Center for International Experience (CIPE) - see CIPE website for list of currently approved programs. Applications to receive credit for non-listed summer programs can also be submitted - > CLICK HERE for information.  All applications must be submitted prior to enrollment, and by the required application deadlineSee also, Yale credit transfer terms and requirements.


Programs below are Coordinated by Yale Study Abroad, Yale Center for International Experience. Approved for Yale College credit.

 

ACADEMIC YEAR

International Sustainable Development Studies Institute (ISDSI)
Chiang Mai, Thailand
Academically challenging and intensely experiential, ISDSI courses are expeditions into the cultures and ecology of Thailand. Each course is focused on understanding sustainable development and is designed in collaboration with local communities.

SIT Indonesia: Arts, Religion, and Social Change
Bedulu, Indonesia
Examine the important roles played by Indonesia’s six officially recognized religions and the arts in shaping sociocultural discourses in Bali and Java. This program, based in Bali, blends contemporary culture and politics with rich cultural traditions in the arts and religion.

SIT Vietnam: Culture, Social Change and Development(academic year - University of Economics, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam).
Academic studies followed by service learning field project - examine Vietnam’s traditional culture and value systems as well as the country’s more recent economic, social, and environmental change.
Apply through >Yale Center for International Experience.

 

SUMMER

Yale Global Summer Program (National University of Singapore)
Provides intensive, residential summer courses to undergraduate students from Yale and IARU member institutions.  Taught in English at the 10 International Alliance of Research Universities (IARU)